Evernote Book

Brett Kelly has written a book called Evernote Essentials.  If you’ve been considering using Evernote, this Evernote book is the guide you’ll want to makes you are getting the most out of it. The PDF is well illustrated and covers a lot of the details that you probably won’t discover on your own.  It took me about 3 minutes of skimming through the book to discover 5 huge timesavers that I didn’t previously know about. The book isn’t just limited to Evernote.  It shows you how to integrate other services as well.  For example, there are detailed instructions showing how to set up Gmail to automatically log receipts from Amazon purchases into Evernote. The PDF book is $25 and is highly recommended.

Comments

  1. Bojan says

    That’s way too much for an ebook…. I am considering to buy membership… And now they slam me with this nice fee for Evernote tutorial… Damn…

    • Mark Shead says

      The book wasn’t written by Evernote. It was written by someone who didn’t even work for them. (After they saw it they hired him, but he wasn’t an employee when he wrote it.) Regarding the price, it is a very good, very detailed book. However, you can figure out how to use Evernote by looking at their help files and just fiddling around with it. This particular book gives you a bunch of use case ideas or suggestions on how you could use the tool in a variety of different settings.

      Obviously the value of the book to you personally depends on how valuable your time is. Generally if I can pay $25 for something that saves me a few hours of time, it is well worth it. Other people may only be willing to pay $5 for something that saves them a few hours. So the cost benefit may not be appropriate for everyone, but it tends to be worth it for most people. Still, if it is out of your price range, don’t forget that it is just a tool. If you are willing to really put the time into experimenting and learning Evernote on your own, you can become very good at understanding all of its features.

  2. Frugal McCanny says

    I’d pay $45 for a good hard-cover book express posted to me – but for an ebook?
    Considering only Evernote customers would be interested in this, Evernote should buy the rights to this and provide free of charge to those who subscribe for a two year period.

    • Mark Shead says

      Someone who uses Evernote 5 minutes a day and makes $5 per hour might not get a good return on investment from it so it wouldn’t seem like a good deal to them. However, it doesn’t take much for it to be well worth it to someone who uses Evernote for several hours each day and earns $250 per hour. Where you fall in the spectrum between those two extremes will determine if the book seems like a great deal or not. It is very good content, but obviously isn’t targeted at everyone.

      Part of what makes it seem expensive to some people is the fact that Evernote has a free version and even the premium version is only $5 per month. If you had to pay $1000 to get Evernote, spending $45 on learning how to use it wouldn’t seem like much. Evernote has different type of business plan than a lot of software companies (although one that is becoming more common) so it is easy to undervalue the book when you are looking at the free or low cost of Evernote. I think this is going to become an increasingly common thing as more companies go to a subscription model. It will be interesting to see how the book market adapts. On one hand many people are usually used to paying for good information and training–regardless of how much they have to pay for the thing they are getting trained on. On the other, I wonder if publishers will adopt more of a subscription model to mimic what is happening in software. If will be interesting to watch.

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